One Mom’s Journey from Fat to Skinny to Confident

JOURNAL

A Low FODMAP Diet for the New Year?

56 Comments 4590 views

Note: Sorry to my email subscribers for being bombarded yesterday. I had an error my RSS feed and it caused a backup. Hopefully all the redesign quirks will be ironed out this week.

After weeks of waiting for my appointment I have finally seen a gastroenterologist, the same one who did my colonoscopy in 2009. He’s a trip. Super nice and exactly the kind of guy you want to tell all your poop problems too.

Yup, I said poop problems.

I mentioned here and there about my tummy troubles but I never really went into details because, well, it’s embarrassing and it makes me feel freakin’ old. I mean, in the past few months I’ve had a mammogram, ultrasound, attended physical therapy sessions for my neck and now I’m on a first name basis with a gastroenterologist. Before I know it I’ll have one of those weekly pill containers to store my prescriptions and an eye glass leash so I don’t lose my bifocals.

Anyway, I went to see him because things haven’t been… ummm how should I say this… solid? I honestly can’t remember the last time I left the bathroom feeling normal. After I talked to my GYN about it she urged me to see the gastroenterologist.

His conclusion? IBS (Irritable Bowl Syndrome), more than likely diet based and nothing to worry about. He drew some blood to test for celiac disease and suggested I either take low doses of Imodium as needed or give the low FODMAP diet a try.

The Imodium suggestion didn’t interest me. It feels more like a band-aid solution to a problem I should probably figure out the source of. So I inquired more about FODMAP because I honestly never heard of it.

FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols, all of which are carbohydrates that can be poorly digested by some people. According to the documentation the doctor gave me it breaks down to:

  • Lactose
  • Fructose
  • Fructans
  • Galactans
  • Sugar Alcohols

Lactose, I know, is a milk thing and I’ve actually reintroduced more milk into my diet recently so it’s my No. 1 suspect. I’ve always eaten milk products in the past without a problem but Doc said you can become lactose intolerant as you age. I had no idea!

Fructose is found in fruit, honey, high fructose corn syrup and agave. It’s only a problem in foods that don’t contain the same amount of glucose, which helps its absorption, like apples, pears and manages, all of which I do eat quite a bit.

Fructans is a totally new word to me. When I researched it a bit I found inulin to be the first thing listed and I know how my body reacts to that! Fiber One Bar anyone?  Yikes!  Fructans are apparently completely malabsorbed because we lack the enzyme to break them down. Fructans include things like wheat, garlic, and onion.

Galactans are similar to Fructans but found in beans and lentils.

Sugar Alcohols are naturally found in stone fruits but they are also added to a lot of diet foods in the forms of sorbitol, xylitol, mannitol and maltitol.

As much as I hate having a diet that makes certain foods off limits, it’s time I got to the bottom of my bathroom issues. Doc said it should only take a few weeks to figure out the culprit.

It feels super overwhelming to hop right in, especially with a fridge full of leftovers from the holidays. So I’m starting off by just eliminating lactose to see how my body responds. Then, if there’s no change I’m going to hop in full force.

The list of FODMAP foods to avoid is pretty intense.

Dairy

Avoid: buttermilk, chocolate, creamy/cheesy sauces, custard, ice cream, milk (cow’s, goat’s, sheep’s, condensed, evaporated), soft cheeses (cottage, ricotta, etc), sour cream

Limit: cream cheese, half and half, hard cheeses (cheddar, colby, parmesan, swiss, etc), soft cheeses (brie, feta, mozzarella, etc), sherbet, yogurt (Greek), whipped cream

Non-Meat Proteins

Avoid: cashews, beans, black-eyed peas, bulgur, lentils, miso, pistachios, soybeans, soy milk (made from soybeans)

Limit: almonds, hazelnuts

Grains

Avoid: wheat, barley, rye, farro, chicory root, inulin

Fruits

Avoid: apples, applesauce, apricots, blackberries, boysenberries, canned fruit, dates, dried fruits, figs, guava, mango, nectarines, papaya, peaches, pears, plums, persimmon, prunes, watermelon

Limit: avocado, cherries, grapefruit, pomegranate, coconut

Vegetables

Avoid: artichokes, cauliflower, mushrooms, sugar snap peas

Limit: artichoke hearts, asparagus, beet, broccoli, brussels sprouts, butternut, pumpkin, cabbage, celery, green peas, okra, snow peas, corn, sweet potato

So many of my favorite foods are on that list. It sucks! I’m really hoping it’s a lactose thing, but I’m really curious how my blood work comes back about celiac. I doubt I have it but you never know.

Have you tried the low-FODMAP diet before? I’d love hear some experiences as, honestly, it seems impossible to follow. I look at the list and think, Geesh! What can I eat?



Leave a comment

I’d love to hear your story or thoughts on mine.

However, to prevent the massive amounts of spam I was receiving I have turned off comments on any post older than 5 days old. If you'd like to leave me a note regarding this post or anything really try me on twitter (@RoniNoone,) my Facebook page, or even IG (@RoniNoone) I'm so sorry for the inconvenience. I never thought I'd have to do this but it's gotten way out of hand and comment management has become simply too time consuming to manage.

Discussion

There are 56 comments so far.

    Beverly

    December 31, 2014

    Hi Roni,

    Long time reader and fan. I was just diagnosed this year at 38 years old as Celiac. It has been a game changer. I feel so much better. There is so much information out there and it was so much easier to adapt than I thought. I went to a highly regarded nutritionist who told me that whey is the highest lactose concentrated ingredient out there. Something like 78% lactose. So look for that ingredient in the next few weeks. It is surprisingly in everything. Good luck!

      roni

      December 31, 2014

      Really? I though whey has no lactose? I need to look into this.

      julia

      January 1, 2015

      Hello ladies, I just wanted to clarify something here. As a soon-to-be dietitian I can assure you that whey and lactose are two different things. Whey and Casein are the two only PROTEINS present in milk whereas lactose is the only SUGAR (a disaccharide) present in milk. Eliminating lactose because it is a sugar (fodmap) has nothing to do with whey. Also IBS and Celiac’s are two different conditions. Roni, I hope that you look into this before eliminating whey (don’t take my word for it!). I’m a huge fan by the way :)

      Julia

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      I’m glad you chimed in! That’s what I thought.

      RG1

      January 2, 2015

      Yup, I love the idea of hot chocolate or cocoa dusted banana, but better be close to the bathroom. I’m surprised coffee isn’t on the lists, but I don’t think Roni is a big drinker.

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      I’m not. It’s just not my thing. As for banana and cocoa powder aren’t both on the safe list?? SO overwhelming!

      Beverly

      January 2, 2015

      Definitely look into this because my research tells me that whey is high lactose. I know wikipedia isn’t the best source but it was quick at my finger tips. This is a excerpt: “Because whey contains lactose, it should be avoided by those who are lactose intolerant. Dried whey, a very common food additive, contains 76.9% lactose.[10] When used as a food additive, whey can contribute to quantities of lactose far above the level of tolerance of most lactose-intolerant individuals.” Also, webmd says to avoid if you have a milk allergy. Guess this just goes to show that it is so complicated and hard to navigate with conflicting information. Good luck on your journey. Mine has been a positive one over all.

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      OK, so from what I found whey protein isolate is virtually lactose free but yes some whey forms can contain lactose. I just looked and the shake I’m currently using is whey protein isolate thankfully!

      RG1

      January 2, 2015

      reply fail, my comment obv. belonged in the chocolate thread.

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      That’s my fault. There’s something wrong with my new theme. I hope to have it fixed soon!

      RG1

      January 2, 2015

      Im not on Fodmap, but a tsp cocoa gets to me. Maybe didn’t help that I was making it with mint tea, great flavor, but hot water was just as bad. I’ve had hot cocoa mix, and do okay, but its pretty weak in cocoa, high in sugar. Agree that bananas should be okay. I finally gave up on raw lettuce- outside of small amounts. I used to eat salad for lunch every day, so its an adjustment. Now I eat a lot more cooked greens. Generally I’d guess cooked (onion, cauliflower) is easier than raw.

    Deb Roby

    December 31, 2014

    Oh, Roni! I’ve look at the FODMAPs diet for my own problems, and I just can’t….
    I’ve also suggested it to friends with IBS, and they won’t…

    Good luck with it.

    I laughed so hard at your description of an old person! Except for the bifocal leash (I need one, but I’m resisting it)… you described me perfectly!

      roni

      December 31, 2014

      It’s really intimidating and I wonder if a better approach is just to tackle one item at a time instead of all 4?

    Caroline

    December 31, 2014

    Fingers crossed it’s not celiac. I do not follow a low-FODMAP diet but several years ago I was diagnosed with a bunch of food allergies. I was so overwhelmed when I first looked at the list of things I could not eat. I made a list of all the foods I could eat and tried to focus on that. I keep snacks in my purse at all times and that is a huge help. Hope you start feeling better soon!

      roni

      December 31, 2014

      That’s the best approach. I never responded well to the you can’t have list. I like the you can have list better. :) My fingers are crossed!

    Paige

    December 31, 2014

    I know the “p” word is a touchy subject, but if you just think of the word “paleo” as SEO for grain- and dairy-free whole foods, I think you’ll find some great recipes.

    I especially recommend The Clothes Make the Girl and Nom Nom Paleo for awesome recipes so that tend towards just great flavors and not a bunch of dessert recipes (which won’t help you much since they’re usually nut-based).

    Good luck! I appreciate that you’re looking for the underlying issue rather than a band-aid. Our bodies want to be healthy, but we have to give them the right tools to work with!

      roni

      December 31, 2014

      I’m not anti Paleo per se… there’s just so much buzz around it and I don’t like hoping on trend bandwagons. I learned that lesson with Atkins and low carb a long time ago. That being said I follow a ton of paleo blogs and get lots of ideas from them and I can see my diet naturally going in that direction away. I just won’t wake up one day and be paleo. I’m in more of a slow transition with my diet and it’s helping make more long term changes.

    Renee

    December 31, 2014

    Hi Roni,
    My experience with FODMAPS was to start by eliminating only the high-FODMAP foods that I ate frequently. Apples, almonds and green peppers were such a staple in my diet, that simply eliminating these three foods gave me almost immediate relief of some symptoms. I use the list as a guide, and adjust based on how I feel. Please don’t think of FODMAPS as an all or nothing proposition. Small tweaks in my diet have made a huge difference. Good luck!

    Shauna

    December 31, 2014

    I became lactose intolerant also! I went paleo for a month to see if it would help my potty problems and when I reintroduced Milk products it was AWFUL. I never realized how much bloat/gas/irritation was associated with my milk products. Lactaid for me now.

    That list looks like a lot of things would be off limits. I hope you can narrow it down to what it is exactly. Keep us posted – we all want you to feel BETTER!

    Jenn@slim-shoppin

    December 31, 2014

    I do some web consulting for a dietician and cookbook author. All her recipes are adaptable to the FODMAP. Her site is www.glutenfreeez.com

    I also help out a woman who is celiac and all her recipes are gluten-free/dairy free www.specialeats.com

    My other favorite site is www.thehealthyapple.com – also gluten free.

    Hope you can figure out what is at the root so you feel better Roni!

    Melissa

    December 31, 2014

    Roni:

    I have had IBS since High School, and I am 50+ now. Lactose is definitely the biggest culprit, even lactose free and lactaid don’t reliably prevent an attack. I have had issues with all of the other items on occasion. Take heart though, limiting and avoiding probably doesn’t mean forever. Once you know which items affect you significantly, you can probably have some of the others with no problem, and others maybe just occasionally. I would never dare to drink milk or a milkshake, but I still eat cheese, but not every day and not large quantities. I eat fruit, but in moderation, but apples are a rarity as they seem to give me a lot of trouble. You’ll figure out what works for you and what doesn’t. I also take a probiotic every day and swear by it. If I run out and skip more than 2 days I have an attack. Which brings me to another thing – for me IBS flares and goes into “remission”. If I have an attack it will likely last a week or two, and then I’m better for a while. Stress is also a factor, and extreme stress without a doubt impacts my stomachs ability to tolerate some foods. Wishing you the best. You are so in tune with your body I know you’ll be just fine soon enough!

    nancyabc

    December 31, 2014

    It worries me that so many people are having problems with food. I’ve been teaching school for 40 years and the first 20 years I didn’t have a child with any food problems—-where are they all coming from??

      petunia

      January 1, 2015

      Really….I think people talk themselves into it for attention mainly.

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      I think it’s a combo of us being more aware and over sensitive to things.

    Jenny

    December 31, 2014

    I started the low FODMAP diet last February, and was overwhelmed just like you. I can say though that this has been the best my “gut” has felt in my entire life. There are times I still eat foods that I know will bother me, but it’s so nice to have control over how you feel.If I’m good 80% of the time, the results on my digestive system are still manageable. Almond milk is a lifesaver if you can’t have dairy. I have a smoothie almost every morning with a frozen banana and PB2 powder. I’ve found tons of low FODMAP info and recipes through Pinterest. If you want to check out my pins my name is Jen Sommers Graber and I think this link will get you there. http://www.pinterest.com/canuweedit/
    Best of luck! Let us know how it goes.

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      Thanks for the link! That’s great! I’m like you too, I just want to know then I can decide if it’s worth it. Like having ice cream or bread or whatever. First step is identifying.

    Renee

    December 31, 2014

    Hey Roni – I was diagnosed with IBS years ago, and found that trying to identify the main culprits and staying away from them was the most effective approach for me. The low FODMAPS diet is too restrictive (for me), and as I slowly identified what my triggers were, it was actually pretty easy to stay away from them because it wasn’t worth the consequences. Like you, inulin is a HUGE one for me. Chicory root is the same thing; I read labels carefully because these days food manufacturers seem to be adding it to everything (it’s even in those newer 100-calorie Chobani yogurts). I’ve also found that green peppers and spicy peppers (jalapeno, etc.) have a similar effect. Besides that, what I’ve found is that I can have pretty much anything, but need to eat smaller portions of some things at one sitting. I can eat a small portion of something with a cream sauce, but not a main course. Same with a dish that has a lot of fibrous vegetables or fruits. Yogurt and cheese aren’t a problem, but if I start increasing my milk consumption things flare up. Sorry this is getting long. Just giving you some examples of what I’ve found with experimenting, in hopes of encouraging you that you don’t just need to give up everything on those lists. The foods, and portions, are SO individual. Using a food journal will help you figure out what works for you. Good luck. :)

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      I’ve been on the look out for inulin for year. The gas is INSANE when I eat anything with it in it and yes, it’s always Chicory Root. Thanks for sharing your experience, I have a feeling I will be approaching it really similar. I’m really hoping it’s mostly a lactose thing.

      Pb

      January 1, 2015

      The reason people have food issues now is that most of our food isn’t the food it used to be.

      Organic food used to just be normal food until companies like Monsanto decided to make money by genetically and chemically modifying our food.

    Meg

    January 1, 2015

    Hi Roni, Just wanted to write & ask if you’ve ever tried digestive enzymes? I take some from Trader Joe’s that really seem to help me within a couple of days of taking.

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      I haven’t. The doc mentioned probiotics but I never notice a difference when I take or don’t take them. I will look into it.

    Kathy

    January 1, 2015

    If the diet changes don’t help, maybe you might slow down on some of the running. You have really pushed yourself so hard in making and achieving new fitness goals, but these have also brought you some physical aliments.
    I know how you love running, but it’s something to consider if the diet changes don’t help. Maybe even keep the cross fit and drop the running for awhile to see if after not stressing your body with all the miles will give you relief.
    A friend of mine had this problem and after she backed off all the half marathons (and training for them) she got better. Just thought it might be worth a try, since she had success .

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      Actually I haven’t run at all this past month (pretty much since the marathon) but that is interesting. I wonder how the physical stress affects the gut.

    Anna Bell

    January 1, 2015

    Avoid chocolate.I know it’s not easy

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      I know, right? I’m such a chocoholic!

      Michelle

      January 2, 2015

      This is for Roni, but this has to do with this thread! :) Here’s a link that explains how gut health and physical stress are linked. http://www.thepaleomom.com/2014/10/exercising-much-hurts-gut.html

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      This is fascinating!

    Mehgann

    January 1, 2015

    I was diagnosed with IBS several years ago, and my approach was to avoid one group from the FODMAPS diet every two weeks to see which ones improved my issues. Once I narrowed it down to the groups, I started playing with different foods from the groups. I have (over the last several years) found out that there are exactly nine particular foods that give me issues (three of which I ate pretty regularly before I did all of this). I can easily avoid nine foods. It took time, but I’m feeling so much better now. You can do this!

      roni

      January 1, 2015

      That’s going to be my approach. It seems much less daunting. Just knowing the list is helping. It gives you a starting point.

    Karen

    January 1, 2015

    Oh Roni,

    You have exactly described what I felt like two years ago. After meeting with many doctors (like you) I kept a food journal and one of them suggested to omit all artificial sweeteners from my diet. I was skeptical but did as asked and WOW what a life changer it was. At first it was very hard, there is artificial sweetener in so many items out there but I did it with help from my husband and I am so much happier.

    I hope you can find happiness in health soon.

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      SO glad you found your culprit!

    Karen P

    January 2, 2015

    Roni- first of all, sorry to hear of your FODMAP woes… It’s painful and no fun. I know because I eat in a modified AIP, Paleo-ish food template. My gut feels much better now from not eating certain foods (mostly your problem, but sometimes to slow… all very painful).

    1. Best resources are The Paleo Approach (Sarah Ballantyne, Phd) and her Cookbook. Her cookbook has the best info on FODMAPs, how to modify basic recipes to be FODMAP free. That would give you the best ideas in your already recipe oriented thinking process.

    2. Think of foods as either making you well or making you sick. Drop the “I will not live another day and binge 1000 binges if I don’t have ______ (insert binge food of the year) ” mantras of the past. Once you are eating for good gut health – which will promote good health overall I find that I have almost no binge urges. After 40 years of on and of morbid obesity- I feel so much better and I’m not trying to moderate food that keeps my gut and health sick….. and binge urges are still there, I’m one month shy of 3 years of super solid weight maintenance. Much healthier gut, very low inflammation(hs-CRP is 1 or lower, used to be fighting a heart attack at 6.8). I predict the mean girl of the binge pantry will be shown the front door, not just the pantry door and there will be no twizzler binging at Fitbloggin 15, only sourcing of food that will keep you out of the ladies room… A whole new world.

    3. Getting my food template worked out for better gut flora also resulted in a smooth transition from peri-menopause to full on menopause. I feel young, (28 instead of 48), almost no hot flashes, and sleeping like a baby. I’ve stayed 5 pounds within my 70 pounds lost and…… drum roll……. gotten leaner and more muscular. I can wait to see your body transformation. Girl…. crossfit, a good FODMAP diet that keeps you well….. Oh, yeah… I suspect you will actually be healthier after you get your template down than before these things were a problem. I can’t wait to see your transformation.

    4. I salute you for addressing and not band-aiding your problem. As a pill popping, medicating society much and be fixed (not all, but most) via changing our food template. I changed mine for long term wellness and my daughter is eating much better, too Her health will help her to avoid some preventable diseases (type 2 diabetes, obesity, etc)

    5. Look you are a change leader in your weight loss and weight maintenance blogging land. You deserve 1000 high fives for not band-aiding your problem and seeking a real food solution to your GI problems and blogging about it. Many people will be lead to real, healthy fixes and find relief from other problems as well.

    6. The food template that ends up working for you will be custom. If you get 10 post auto-immune thyroid, menopausal, former binge eaters in a room (Fitbloggin or PaleoFX 2015), you’ll find we are all very different in our food templates (keto, Paleo-ish, Primal, low-carb high fat, carb backloading, cheat day, Mediterranean diet, low FODMAP, AIP, modifed AIP, crossfit competitions, food addictions). All work for each person because of our genetics,past and present gut health, environment and personality. Here’s to customizing your personal template and getting well again.

    I salute you and your leadership and I know others will learn and feel better in 2015. Bravo! Karen P

      Karen P

      January 2, 2015

      Want to see what a modified FODMAP/ Auto-Immune Protocol food template looks like? You and I are buddies on MFP. Look for me GardenGirl KP or Karen P. My diary is open. Remember, I don’t cross-fit, have a desk job, and am post menopause, so my total intake will be lower… but I keep a clean, nutrient dense food template that keeps my GUT bacteria in check. Good luck and see you at MFP.

      roni

      January 2, 2015

      I will totally check our your food journals. Thanks!!

    RG1

    January 2, 2015

    Its interesting to see things that bother me (insulin, maltilol, tofu) mixed with things that I’ve always thought of as super digestible (apples, lentils). Lentils without skin plus white rice, cooked together until very soft (kichhri) is a staple in sick food/ stomach issues. Generally, my approach is to reduce the insoluble fiber (peeling apples, chickpeas) and increase soluble (oatmeal, high pectin fruit). also if you soak raw almonds, you can peel them and is how I started winter mornings every day as a kid (cultural thing). good luck!

    Chris

    January 2, 2015

    Karen P. I’m not sure if you’re a gastroenterologist, but let me assure you that I take daily medication for my severe IBS-D so that I can leave my house, not as a “band-aid”. After dealing with this for years and trying to find a way to manage my IBS through diet, I now use a combination of both, and still occasionally have days when I have to stay home. Thanks for painting all IBS sufferers with your broad brush.

    Michele

    January 3, 2015

    I have IBS and I’ve never heard of FODMAP. Interesting. I will need to read up on it. I do take Immodium when needed because sometimes there is just no other way for me to deal with it (today was an example – I wouldn’t have been able to leave the house). I don’t look at taking it as a negative because whatever helps is what I need to do and I don’t think it’s a band-aid. If I had high blood pressure and needed to take a pill for it, what would the difference be?

    Anyway, I used to think lactose was the culprit but now I’m not so sure. I do know that if I overeat ANYTHING, I will pay for it the next day. I know for sure I can’t eat anything with inulin, chicory root or sugar alcohols! I learned that the hard way when I was losing weight and eating sugar free candies and Fiber One bars!

    Paula

    January 3, 2015

    As someone who has poop issues I had to respond to your post. I have always had some issues, but in 2011 it was the worst. So bad that I lost weight, so bad an emergency room visit led to the question “are you doing this to yourself?” It did finally get somewhat back to normal on its own, but a good natural medicine dr helped me. The 3 top reasons for distress (diarrhea) for me were:

    1. Gluten
    2. Dairy
    3. Sugar especially chocolate

    When I chose a “wholesome” or “clean” diet, I finally had normal poop cycles. So I believe you should test yourself to find what are your “trigger” foods. I still have some gluten, dairy or chocolate, but it is VERY limited. It is nicer now that it isn’t necessary for me to know where each toilet is every time I take a trip from home.

    Beth

    January 3, 2015

    I had similar issues this last year. Gastro recommended FODMAP diet. I was sad because I also eat many of these foods regularly. I did it though and it helped a bit. Finally got a colonoscopy and endoscopy. Thankfully aside from some acid reflux I was fine. No celiac or IBS. I started Align probiotic which helped. Recently I limited all dairy and wheat and I was much better. Good luck!

    Andrea W

    January 4, 2015

    This is my first time visit on your blog! I found it amazing, I will keep coming!

    Keri

    January 5, 2015

    I have IBS that is tied to my state of mind. If I am on auto-pilot, tirelessly moving from one task to another, not paying attention to whether I am being responsible with my mental/emotional energy–I’ll get sick. Once I realize I’ve been on auto-pilot and get grounded, balanced, and mindful of how I am spending my energy–I’ll get better. When I am sick, I can’t tolerate any foods (not even pureed). When I am not sick, I can eat absolutely everything with no restrictions. I have been offered medications but turned them down because I appreciate that my body lets me know when my pace and balance are off. Just wanted to share in case it helps you figure out what makes you sick and in case it isn’t diet-related. Good luck!!

    Lisa

    January 5, 2015

    Roni,
    I can relate to your digestive woes, IBS, and following a low FODMAP diet. The absolute best resource I have found for FODMAPs is a book called IBS: FREE AT LAST! CHANGE YOUR CARBS, CHANGE YOUR LIFE WITH THE FODMAP ELIMINATION DIET by Patsy Catsos. I ordered my copy from Amazon. She explains in great detail how the type of carbs you eat affect your IBS and walks you through the process of identifying your trigger foods. I have suffered with digestive issues since my early 20’s (I’m 48) and am happy to pass along what has helped me. You are more than welcome to email me with any questions or for more details about my situation and what has/hasn’t helped me. I’m always happy to share just as others have shared with me.

    Rina

    January 6, 2015

    I am new to your blog. Sorry to hear about your digestive challenges. Hope that you figure it out.
    I read a lot about these things in Practical Paleo and The Paleo Mom. Have you looked into their info?

    Hannah Rowley

    January 8, 2015

    Hi Roni – The best reference recommendation I can give you is a book called The Complete Low-FODMAP Diet by Sue Shepherd. The book includes 7- and 14-day meal plans and provides some guidance about reintroducing FODMAP foods after being on the diet. You’re right it is complicated but it’s doable.

      roni

      January 9, 2015

      Thanks! I’m going to order a few on Amazon!

    Nicole

    January 22, 2015

    Hi Roni, Just saw this post after your follow-up post yesterday. Inulin is also a huge one for me, but I was really surprised when I realized that flax is a big trigger to me. I read somewhere to try to just include small amounts and slowly ramp it up, but I could never get past 1 tsp (in a small batch of muffins or pancakes). High fat meals (which are pretty common if you follow paleo recipes) and iron supplementation (was taking prenatals as we were ttc) were also big triggers for me. I am so thankful that I don’t have to limit cruciferous veggies (many on the FODMAP list!) because those are my faves!